Female Golfer If it goes right it's a slice if it goes left it's a hook if it goes straight it's a miracle poster, canvas

 Female Golfer If it goes right it's a slice if it goes left it's a hook if it goes straight it's a miracle poster, canvas

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The black sheep jumper was, like so much of her wardrobe, big, bold, and clever. If you’ve ever been tempted to write off Diana’s style as ’80s excess—as I’ll confess I have, on occasion—I urge you to reconsider. The People’s Princess was a master dresser, tailoring her style not just to what she was doing or who she was meeting, but to how she was feeling. As Patrick Jephson, her equerry, private secretary, and chief of staff, told me, when it came to Diana’s wardrobe, “there was always a message.”


Lady Diana Spencer was one half of the highest-profile courtship the British royal family had seen in decades. She and Prince Charles began dating just as the global media landscape was exploding. It was the advent of 24/7 cable-news coverage and the early days of weekly celebrity glossy magazines, allowing the rest of the world to follow their relationship in real time.

The phenomenon of Diana, and her fashion, stemmed in part from how visible she was right from the start. As she was plucked from relative—albeit aristocratic—obscurity and presented as a princess-to-be, the cameras were always there. The paparazzi hounded her on the streets of London following rampant rumors of her involvement with the heir apparent. Once she joined the family, Diana was the irresistible new subject of the noticeably expanded royal press pack. The constant coverage catapulted her into a new sphere of notoriety. It wasn’t just the people she shook hands with who felt close to her; now anyone enjoying a cup of tea with their morning newspaper could too. Diana’s status as Charles’s bride would have earned her a place on the front page regardless. But her clothing kept her there, day after day.



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